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  • Stagnation continues in the Kansas economy with tax & spend mentality

    Stagnation continues in the Kansas economy with tax & spend mentality0

    Contrary to what you may hear from the state’s major newspapers and TV stations, the Kansas economy isn’t doing very well.  It’s not a secret – the public data clearly shows Kansas trailing the nation in jobs and other measures of economic growth – so ignoring the negative economic news is a conscious decision. WeREAD MORE
  • 25 months of excessive revenue continue decades of stagnation

    25 months of excessive revenue continue decades of stagnation0

    August 2022 was the 25th month in a row that Kansas exceeded its expected tax collections. Where the government sees dollar signs in excessive revenue, Kansas families see two years of over-taxation through a pandemic and high inflation. There’s room for tax relief this upcoming year to help. Last month, the state took in $652.5

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  • Excess tax collections are not good for taxpayers

    Excess tax collections are not good for taxpayers0

    Governor Laura Kelly is heralding tax collections exceeding expectations as a sign of “forward momentum” in the state’s economy, but that is a government-focused viewpoint.  The economic data tells a different story for taxpayers. In July 2022, the state of Kansas took in a total tax revenue of $586.2 million, 27.8% greater than the estimates

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  • 2022 Green Book

    2022 Green Book0

    green book 2022READ MORE
  • Cutting Red Tape in Kansas

    Cutting Red Tape in Kansas0

    Kansas’ 72,645 regulatory restrictions consist of 3.3 million words, which would take the average person 185 hours to read completely. The Mercatus Center’s new study Cutting Red Tape in Kansas: A Menu of Options outlines Kansas’ current position as a regulatory environment and what new directions the state could take to being an even more

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  • Kansas lost $5.7 billion in private-sector GDP in 2020

    Kansas lost $5.7 billion in private-sector GDP in 20200

    Private-sector real GDP dropped 2.8% last year to $137.1 billion, more than wiping out a 1.2% gain in 2019.  Private-sector GDP, which is a measure of all finished goods and services, would have been $5.7 billion higher had it grown at the 2019 rate. The data comes from the Bureau of Economic Analysis and is

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